Sonoran Desert habitat type: Bajadas

Material washing off mountain slopes ends up being at the base forming alluvial fans. These fans coalesce, forming bajadas surrounding the mountain areas. Bajadas are relatively flat areas which gradually slope downward toward the valley floor. Soils are thin, rocky and gravelly and well-drained. Also, at least in the upper parts, bajadas are above much of the winter temperature inversions that inflict the valleys. Because bajadas are less steep and have more soil cover than rocky slopes, moisture runoff is slowed and retention is better than in the latter habitat. The combination of relatively favorable moisture and temperature conditions (i.e. relative lack of extremely low winter temperatures) makes bajadas one of the most productive habitats in the Sonoran Desert in terms of both plant species diversity and productivity. The most productive cactus stands in the Sonoran Desert (i.e., saguaro and chain fruit cholla "forests", and dense stands of buckhorn, staghorn, and pencil chollas) are found on bajadas.

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Some species that could be found in Bajadas.

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